Parasite and Infectious Agent Protocol
A Quick Reference for Healthcare Professionals


By James R. Overman, N.D.

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Introduction to this Quick Reference

 

This Quick Reference has been created for healthcare professionals who are familiar with Dr. Overman's work in parasitology.  It is not meant to take the place of his longer works such as:

  1. Parasites and Infectious Disease, a two day recorded seminar on DVD with a printable syllabus on CD.
  2. Health Assessment, a three day recorded seminar on DVD with a printable syllabus on CD.
  3. Chronic Toxicology, a two day seminar on DVD with a printable syllabus on CD.

If you want the whole story, please familiarize yourself with those works. 

This Quick Reference seeks to:

  1. Put the most important information in a form for easy reference.
  2. Add important information and products that have been developed since the above resourses were written.

 

Identifying Parasites by Muscle Testing

 

Identifying Parasitic Animals

  1. Hold the thumb and little finger together while muscle testing parasitic animals.
  2. Counting the number of species of a class of parasites present in the client is more sensitive than testing for the presence of parasites.
  3. Not every parasite will answer by muscle testing to the name you might suppose.
  4. Here is a list of the classes and stages of parasitic animals, that Dr. Overman uses to muscle test his clients:
    • Amoeba (active and cysts).
    • Arthropods (adults, pupae, larva and eggs).  These may be in the body or on the body.  They may also be vectors for other parasites.
    • E-Nematodes* (adults, larva and eggs).
    • Flukes (adults, larva and eggs).
    • Morgons (pupae, larva and fibers).  These are mutated arthropods.
    • Mutagons (pupae, larva and fibers).  These are mutated morgons or twice mutated arthropods.  This name was made up by Dr. Overman.
    • Pinworms (adults, larva and eggs).
    • Protozoa (active and cysts).
    • Roundworms (adults, larva, eggs and cysts).  Only a few species have cysts.
    • Tapeworms (adults, larva, spargamums, eggs and cysts).  Only a few species have spargamums.
    • Tongue Worms (adults, larva and eggs).
  5. Muscle testing cannot "see" inside cells.  The body can count the number or the % of cells, that are abnormal in some way, by muscle testing.
  6. Here is a list of the places in the body to look for parasitic animals.
    • Blood (protozoa, amoeba, flukes, roundworms and e-nematodes).
    • Inside cells (protozoa, amoeba and roundworms).
    • Inside tumors (tapeworm cysts and flukes).
    • Inside granulomas (tapeworm cysts, roundworm cysts, protozoa cysts, amoeba cysts, blood fluke eggs.
    • Intestinal mucosa (protozoa, amoeba, tapeworms, flukes, roundworms, pinworms, e-nematodes, tongue worms).
      Intestinal tract (protozoa, amoeba, tapeworms, flukes, roundworms, pinworms, e-nematodes, tongue worms).
    • Skin (protozoa, amoeba, tapeworms, flukes, roundworms, pinworms, e-nematodes, tongue worms, arthropods, morgons and mutagons).
    • Tissues and organs (protozoa, amoeba, tapeworms, flukes, roundworms, pinworms, e-nematodes, tongue worms).

*For more information on e-parasites (engineered parasites) see the article, Engineered Infectious Agents at the bottom of the webpage.

 

Identifying Parasitic (Saprophytic) Plants

  1. Hold the thumb and ring finger together, while muscle testing parasitic plants.
  2. Counting the number of species of a class of parasites present in the client is more sensitive than testing for the presence of parasites.
  3. Not every parasite will answer by muscle testing to the name you might suppose.
  4. Here is a list of the classes and stages of parasitic plants that Dr. Overman uses to muscle test his clients:
    • Blue-green algae (usually inside neural cells).
    • E-fungi* (mycelial form and spores).
    • E-microzymas* (this is a pleomorphic form of yeast).
    • E-mildews* (mildew form, mycelial form and spores).
    • E-molds* (mold form, mycelial form and spores).
    • E-yeasts* (yeast form, mycelial form).
    • Fungi (mycelial form and spores).
    • Microzymas (this is a pleomorphic form of yeast and/or mildews).
    • Mildews (mildew form, mycelial form and spores).
    • Slime molds (mold form, mycelial form and spores).
    • Water molds (mold form).
    • Yeasts (yeast form, mycelial form).
  5. Muscle testing cannot "see" inside cells.  The body can count the number or the % of cells, that are abnormal in some way, by muscle testing.
  6. Here is a list of the places in the body to look for parasitic plants.
    • Blood (yeasts, e-yeasts, microzymas, e-microzymas, slime molds, e-molds, water molds, mildews, e-mildews, fungi and e-fungi).
    • Inside cells (e-yeasts, microzymas, e-microzymas, slime molds, e-molds, mildews and e-mildews).
    • Inside DNA (e-yeasts, microzymas, e-microzymas, slime molds, e-molds, mildews, e-mildews, fungi and e-fungi).
    • Inside granulomas (mold spores, mildew spores and fungi spores)
    • Inside tumors (microzymas, slime molds, e-molds, water molds, mildews, e-mildews, fungi and e-fungi).
    • Intestinal mucosa (yeasts, e-yeasts, microzymas, e-microzymas, slime molds, e-molds, water molds, mildews, e-mildews, fungi and e-fungi).
    • Intestinal tract (yeasts, microzymas, slime molds, e-molds, water molds, mildews and fungi).
    • Skin (yeasts, microzymas, slime molds, e-molds, water molds, mildews, e-mildews, fungi and e-fungi).
    • Tissues and organs (yeasts, microzymas, slime molds, e-molds, water molds, mildews and fungi).

*For more information on e-parasites (engineered parasites) see the article, Engineered Infectious Agents at the bottom of the webpage.

 

Identifying Microparasites

  1. Hold the thumb and little finger together while muscle testing microparasites.
  2. Counting the number of species of a class of parasites present in the client is more sensitive than testing for the presence of parasites.
  3. Not every parasite will answer by muscle testing to the name you might suppose.
  4. Here is a list of the classes and stages of microparasites that Dr. Overman uses to muscle test his clients:
  5. Muscle testing cannot "see" inside cells.  The body can count the number or the % of cells, that are abnormal in some way, by muscle testing.
  6. Here is a list of the places in the body to look for micro-parasites.
    • Abcesses (bacteria).
    • Blood (viruses, altered viruses, e-viruses, oncoviruses, bacteria, spirochetes, mycoplasmas, altered mycoplasmas, e-mycoplasmas and Nanobacteria).
    • Inside calcifications (spirochetes and Nanobacteria).
    • Inside cells (viruses, altered viruses, e-viruses, oncoviruses, bacteria, spirochetes, mycoplasmas, altered mycoplasmas, e-mycoplasmas and Nanobacteria).
    • Inside DNA (viruses, altered viruses, e-viruses, oncoviruses, mycoplasmas, altered mycoplasmas, e-mycoplasmas and Nanobacteria).
    • Intestinal tract (viruses, altered viruses, e-viruses, oncoviruses, bacteria, spirochetes, mycoplasmas, altered mycoplasmas, e-mycoplasmas and Nanobacteria).
    • Intestinal mucosa (viruses, altered viruses, e-viruses, oncoviruses, bacteria, spirochetes, mycoplasmas, altered mycoplasmas, e-mycoplasmas and Nanobacteria).
    • Inside tumors (oncoviruses, bacteria, spirochetes, mycoplasmas, altered mycoplasmas, e-mycoplasmas and Nanobacteria).
    • Skin (e-viruses, oncoviruses, bacteria, spirochetes, mycoplasmas, altered mycoplasmas, e-mycoplasmas and Nanobacteria).
    • Tissues and organs (viruses, altered viruses, e-viruses, oncoviruses, bacteria, spirochetes, mycoplasmas, altered mycoplasmas, e-mycoplasmas and Nanobacteria).

*For more information on e-parasites (engineered parasites) see the article, Engineered Infectious Agents at the bottom of the webpage.

 

Identifying Parasitic Molecules

  1. Hold the thumb and middle finger together, while muscle testing parasitic molecules.
  2. Here is a list of the classes of parasitic molecules that Dr. Overman uses to muscle test his clients:
  3. Muscle testing cannot "see" inside cells.  The body can count the number or the % of cells, that are abnormal in some way, by muscle testing.
  4. Here is a list of the places in the body to look for parasitic molecules.
    • Blood (prions, altered proteins, GMO proteins and mutated DNA).
    • Inside cells (prions, altered proteins and GMO proteins).
    • Inside DNA (mutated mitochondrial DNA and mutated DNA).
    • Inside tumors (altered proteins, GMO proteins and mutated DNA).
    • Skin (prions, altered proteins, GMO proteins and mutated DNA).

 

Muscle Testing Anomalies      Some species of parasites cannot be found by muscle testing without knowing the name that the body recognizes for them. How can I find these? 

You will need to memorize these, or keep this reference in mind while checking. Dr. Overman does not know the reason some infectious agents are so picky about their identity. He has just found the following by trial and error. Hopefully you will profit from his hard work?  

ź            Although Amoebae are technically protozoa, they will not answer to the name “protozoa”. You must use the name “amoebae”.

ź            The bacterium, Helicobacter pylori, wants to be called “protozoa” instead of “bacteria”.

ź            Although pinworms are technically roundworms they will not manifest their presence by muscle testing when the name “roundworms” is used. You must use the name “pinworm” when muscle testing.

ź            Pneumocystis carni although classified as a fungus responds by muscle testing as though it were a protozoa.

ź            Species of mycoplasmas and ureaplasmas require the use of the name “mycoplasmas” instead of the name “bacteria”.

ź            Nanobacteria will not answer to the name “bacteria”. Instead you must use the name “Nanobacteria”.

ź            Oncoviruses will not respond to the name “virus”, you must use the name “Oncovirus”.

ź            Weaponized bacteria will not respond to the name “bacteria”, you must use the name “weaponized bacteria” or "engineered bacteria".

ź            Spirochetes and rickettsia will not answer to the name “bacteria”. You must use the name “spirochete”.

ź            Wart viruses will not respond to the name “virus”, you must use the name “wart virus”.

ź            Veracullium albo, Tricomonal fluor and Trichosporon species although similar to mildew will not respond to the name “mildew”. You may find their pleomorphic for using the name “microzyma”, or you may test for them individually by name.

ź            Arthropod pupae will not answer by muscle testing to the name “arthropods”, you must use the word “arthropod pupae”.

ź            Morgons, although mutated arthropods will not answer to the name “arthropods”, you must use the name “morgons”.

ź            Altered viruses (viruses altered by insufficient zapping) do not answer to the name “viruses”, you must use the name “altered viruses”.

 

Note:  None of the engineered parasites (e-parasites) and infectious agents will answer to the common parasite names, you must use the name "engineered" in front of them.

 

Why Is it Necessary to Identify the Class of Parasite?

Each class of parasite has its own requirements for techniques and herbal products needed to eliminate them from the body.

 

Why Is it Necessary to Identify the Location of the Infection?

Each location in the body has its own requirements for techniques and herbal products needed to eliminate parasites from the body.

 

More Information on Muscle Testing

To see a demonstration of muscle testing parasites, please see Parasites and Infectious Disease, a two-day recorded seminar on DVD with a printable syllabus on CD, by Dr. James R. Overman, N.D.

For an extensive course on muscle testing and health assessment, please see Health Assessment, a three-day recorded seminar on DVD with a printable syllabus on CD, by Dr. James R. Overman, N.D.

See pages 199-236 of  Overcoming Parasites Naturally, by Dr. James R. Overman, N.D., for more information on muscle testing in regard to parasites.

See these videos:

 

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